July302014
2AM
rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:
https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

rachelignotofsky:

First illustration in my Women in Science series. Get one for yourself here:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/196197246/women-in-science-marie-curie

2AM
aseaofquotes:

Albert Goldbarth, “The Sciences Sing a Lullaby”

aseaofquotes:

Albert Goldbarth, “The Sciences Sing a Lullaby”

2AM
“When you view the Earth from farther away, as the Apollo astronauts did, it shrinks in apparent size, until nothing but a little geography remains. You’re struck by how self-contained it is. An occasional hydrogen atom leaves; a pitter-patter of cometary dust arrives. Sunlight, generated in the immense, silent thermonuclear engine deep in the solar interior, pours out of the Sun in all directions, and the Earth intercepts enough of it to provide a little illumination and enough heat for our modest purposes. Apart from that, this small world is on its own.” Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot (via whats-out-there)
2AM
jellobiafrasays:

introduction to space (1962 ed., cover design by john decesare)

jellobiafrasays:

introduction to space (1962 ed., cover design by john decesare)

2AM
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

We often think of raindrops as spherical or tear-shaped, but, in reality, a falling droplet’s shape can be much more complicated. Large drops are likely to break up into smaller droplets before reaching the ground. This process is shown in the collage above. The initially spherical drops on the left are exposed to a continuous horizontal jet of air, similar to the situation they would experience if falling at terminal velocity. The drops first flatten into a pancake, then billow into a shape called a bag. The bags consists of a thin liquid sheet with a thicker rim of fluid around the edge. Like a soap bubble, a bag’s surface sheet ruptures quickly, producing a spray of fine droplets as surface tension pulls the damaged sheet apart. The thicker rim survives slightly longer until the Plateau-Rayleigh instability breaks it into droplets as well. (Image credit: V. Kulkarni and P. Sojka)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

We often think of raindrops as spherical or tear-shaped, but, in reality, a falling droplet’s shape can be much more complicated. Large drops are likely to break up into smaller droplets before reaching the ground. This process is shown in the collage above. The initially spherical drops on the left are exposed to a continuous horizontal jet of air, similar to the situation they would experience if falling at terminal velocity. The drops first flatten into a pancake, then billow into a shape called a bag. The bags consists of a thin liquid sheet with a thicker rim of fluid around the edge. Like a soap bubble, a bag’s surface sheet ruptures quickly, producing a spray of fine droplets as surface tension pulls the damaged sheet apart. The thicker rim survives slightly longer until the Plateau-Rayleigh instability breaks it into droplets as well. (Image credit: V. Kulkarni and P. Sojka)

1AM

(Source: sarahmas, via mossedmoth)

1AM
look-like-model:

Twiggy

look-like-model:

Twiggy

(via mossedmoth)

12AM
12AM
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